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Mathematical Modeling of the Sex Worker Industry as a Supply and Demand System

Prostitution is an occupation of global presence, often referred to as the worlds oldest, having existed for millennia. In the United States, the estimated annual prevalence of full-time sex workers is approximately 23 per every 100,000 individuals in the population. We construct two mathematical models to explore the dynamics of the sex industry: one for the males who provide demand and another for the females who provide the supply. We perform qualitative analysis on these models separately, and explore the coupled system numerically. Through this analysis, we provide possible explanations as to why the current system of arrest and detainment does little to control the sex worker population. In addition, we show that if the efforts of legal enforcement focus on making male arrests, it is possible to significantly reduce the number of women in prostitution.

Article Number:
MTBI-03-06M

Year:
2006

Authors:
Lily Davidoff, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Karyn Sutton, Arizona State University
Genevieve-Yvonne Toutain, Arizona State University
Fabio Sánchez, Cornell University
Christopher Kribs-Zaleta, University of Texas at Arlington
Carlos Castillo-Chavez, Arizona State University

mathematical_modeling_of_the_sex_worker_industry_as_a_supply_and_demand_system_.pdf