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Modeling a Novel Method to Control Human Malaria: Insecticide Treated Cattle

Malaria, a re-emergent vector-borne disease, has always had a deep impact on the health and economy of a large percentage of the world population. In areas where malaria vectors also feed on animals, the presence of livestock impacts the risk of disease transmission to humans. Treatment of livestock, with insecticides that are fatal to the vector, has been proposed as a novel approach in malaria control. Promising results have been observed from trials in Pakistan. However, several factors underlying the effectiveness of insecticide treated livestock remain poorly understood. This study looks at the relevance of some of these factors including coverage treatment levels and vector preference. We expand on the Ross-Macdonald framework through the incorporation of vector feeding behaviors. The main focus of this research is to understand the circumstances under which a policy that involves the systematic use of insecticides on livestock will decrease the prevalence of human malaria.

Article Number:
BU-1641-M

Year:
2003

Authors:
Ana Franco, Los Alamos National Laboratory

modeling_a_novel_method_to_control_human_malaria_insecticide_treated_cattle_.pdf