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A Two-Gender Human Papillomavirus Model with an Investigation of the Effects of Male Screening

The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Though few of its more than one hundred strains cause the recognized symptoms of genital warts, HPV's numerous high-risk strains are highly correlated with cervical cancer cases. HPV's symptoms are gender specific since men and women exhibit different degrees of infectiousness and varied symptoms of infection from high-risk strains of HPV. Men rarely exhibit symptoms and are therefore silent carriers of these carcinogenic agents. In this investigation, we focus on the dynamics of a high-risk strain, HPV16, in a heterosexual population. A two-sex model is used to highlight the impact of asymptomatic infectious males on the dynamics of cervical cancer cases. Hence, we concentrate on the effects that increased HPV detection in males might have on the spread of this virus in a heterosexual population, and the incidence of cervical cancer cases associated with HPV16.

Article Number:
BU-1621-M

Year:
2002

Authors:
Jennifer Froelich, University of North Dakota
Zanetta Gant, Alabama A&M University
Aveek Majumdar, Cornell University
Reyes M. Ortiz-Albino, University of Iowa
Michael Lanham, Oxford University

two_gender_human_papillomavirus_model_with_an_investigation_of_the_effects_of_male_screening.pdf