Home / The Effect of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic on the Population of Truck Drivers in South Africa and its Economic Impact

The Effect of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic on the Population of Truck Drivers in South Africa and its Economic Impact

As of the end of 2001, an estimated 28,500,000 people in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) had been infected with the HIV virus, making up 70% of the world's population of HIV-infected people. Such an aggressive epidemic has not only impacted the SSA demography, but also the African economy and culture. The epidemic has begun to seriously damage the transport sector, where long distance truck drivers (TDs) are at an increased risk of infection due to their frequent contacts with commercial sex workers (CSWs). The spread of AIDS in the transport industry is especially significant to the SSA economy as truck drivers are largely responsible for transporting crops and supplies needed for daily subsistence. In this project we present four mathematical models that describe the interaction between the TDs and CSWs from various perspectives. From the analysis and simulation of these models we qualify the decrease in the TD population due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic and discuss its impact on the transportation industry and the SSA economy in general.

Article Number:
BU-1612-M

Year:
2002

Authors:
Melanie Lee, University of California-Los Angeles
Christine Román, St. Mary's University of San Antonio
Shari Wiley, University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff
Carlos Hernández Suárez, Universidad de Colima-México
Christopher Kribs Zaleta, University of Texas-Arlington
Ricardo Oliva, Cornell University

effect_of_hiv_aids_epidemic_on_the_population_of_truck_drivers_in_south_africa_and_its_economic_impact.pdf