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Mouse in the House: Looking at the Spread of Hantavirus in Houses Through the Deer Mouse Population

The Sin Nombre Virus is part of the Bunyaviridae family that causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. The deer mouse, the primary host of Sin Nombre Virus, supports a prevalence of about 25% in its adult population. Since deer mice are typically found in fields, homes, and barns, we examine the risk of infection Sin Nombre Virus poses on humans by looking at the dynamics of the deer mouse population as it moves through homes and barns in rural areas within western Colorado. Hence, the barn and the house are our epidemiological units and, consequently, it is initially assumed that each unit is in one of three infestation states, that is, at zero, low or high mouse infestation. The threshold that governs the likelihood of an epidemiological outbreak is computed. Explicit spatial simulations of small communities that involve the movement of mice and their seasonally driven reproductive capacities are carried out. The impacts of control measures are tested in the stochastic frameworks.

Article Number:
BU-1585-M

Year:
2001

Authors:
Brandon J. Brown, University of California, Irvine
Edgar Cabral, University of California, Irvine
Tiffany R. Hegg, Mesa State College
Project supervisors: Carlos Castillo-Garsow, Cornell University
Baojun Song, Cornell University

mouse_in_the_house_looking_at_the_spread_of_hantavirus_in_houses_through_the_deer_mouse_population_.pdf